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Remembering Heroes on Memorial Day

Remembering the Fallen on Memorial Day

Happy Memorial Day!

  Today is Memorial Day where we honor all the fallen heroes who put their lives in front of others. We wish everyone a safe and happy holiday, simultaneously remembering the fallen.

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An Evening of Broadway Love Songs Benefiting The Actors Temple

A Wing & A Prayer: An Evening of Broadway Love Songs Feb. 13

Benefiting Historic Actors’ Temple & Theatre Space

 

 

NEW YORK –An Evening of Broadway Love Songs benefiting the historic Actors’ Temple, a New York City-based synagogue and Off-Broadway Theatre Space will take place on Monday, February 13th from 8-10 pm at The Actors’ Temple, 339 West 47th Street. As The Actor’s Temple begins to celebrate its 100th anniversary, the special Evening of Broadway Love Songs serves as the kick-off event to help raise funds for the construction of an ADA-accessible restroom facility at the Temple/theatre building as well as to raise awareness of its history and upcoming centennial. A presentation of The Florence Belsky Charitable Foundation  (Flobel), the musical evening’s host will be NYC-based theater director, actor and performance coach Lee Kasper; with multi-talented composer, arranger and pianist Josh Freilich as Musical Director and FloBel Executive Director Daniel Schneider as executive producer. Joining them will be a cast of talented performers; friends from the Broadway community, the French Woods Festival of the Performing Arts and beyond. Tickets for the benefit range from student prices to VIP level; $10 to $50, with a post-show VIP after-party. To purchase tickets visit: http://ActorsTemple.flobel.org.

The February 13th kick-off event is designed to connect the next generation of artists with those who helped build Broadway and the American entertainment industry. In addition to raising funds, a primary purpose of the evening is to renew the Actors’ Temple and Theatre Space’ tradition of being a meeting place for young and old performers from throughout the world, who have chosen to make NYC their home.

 

 

 

LISTING:

 

WHAT:  An Evening of Broadway Love Songs Benefit for the Historic Actors’ Temple & Theatre Space, a kick-off event celebrating its centennial to raise funds for construction of an ADA-accessible restroom facility. The evening will connect next generation of artists with those who helped build Broadway and the American entertainment industry — renewing the 100-year-old tradition of serving as a meeting place for performers from around the world.

 

WHERE:     The Actors’ Temple
           339 West 47th Street, NYC

WHEN:      Monday, February 13th
           8:00 PM – 10:00 PM

PRICE:     Student Level: $10. VIP Level: $50
TICKETS:   http://ActorsTemple.flobel.org.

DONATIONS: www.theactorstemple.org

LINKS:     An Evening of Broadway Love Songs
           https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sscgip1M3A8

 

 

A WING & A PRAYER: AN EVENING OF BROADWAY LOVE SONGS

Presented by The Florence Belsky Charitable Foundation

CAST/CREDITS:

HOST………………………………………………………………………………………..Lee Kasper

MUSICAL DIRECTOR………………………………………………………………..Josh Freilich

EXECUTIVE PRODUCER……………………………………………………………Dan Schneider

Tor Hyams & Lisa Rothauser

Rebecca Kuznick

Michael Linden

Isabella Kearney

Lauren Schorr

Madeline Rhodes

Michael Kushner

Evan Kremin

 

#SaveTheActorsTemple  #YouGottaHaveShtick      #SaveTheCoolShul

 

About The Actors’ Temple

The Actors’ Temple was founded in 1917 as the West Side Hebrew Relief Association. Its leaders were Orthodox Jews who owned shops in the rough-and-tumble district called Hell’s Kitchen, at the time one of the world’s busiest steamship ports. The founders borrowed a Biblical nickname for God, Ezrath Israel, “the One who assists Israel,” as the name for their benevolent little Jewish community center. They provided a place where actors could be accepted and feel at home. The actors introduced their friends to the synagogue, and the rest, as they say, is history. http://www.theactorstemple.org/about-us

About The Florence Belsky Charitable Foundation. Florence Belsky was an avid and generous supporter of the creative arts and numerous cultural institutions, including the Metropolitan Opera; the New York Public Library; Ellis Island Wall of Honor and the Metropolitan Museum. The Foundation’s mission emphasizes “Connecting People, Sharing Ideas, Empowering Each Generation to Teach the Others.”

 

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Be a Part of the Cure Summer Party

 

 

BePartofCure

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Prostate Cancer News You Can Use from Us TOO’s Tom Kirk

Prostate Cancer Important Information Shared by Us TOO’s Tom Kirk

Thought I’d share this WGN-TV news interview with Executive Director Tom Kirk of Us TOO International Prostate Cancer Education and Support Network, who offers invaluable information on Prostate Cancer including the importance for men of getting tested/screened early plus where to seek further information.  

Us TOO is a grass-roots registered 501 (c) (3) non-profit organization whose mission is to help men and their families make informed decisions about prostate cancer detection and treatment through support, education and advocacy. 

 

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Brain Injury New Study Out

Study Details How Brain Injury from Concussions Progresses

By , Time, Health & Family  Dec. 04, 2012

The lasting impact that concussions can have on the brain is on the minds of anyone involved in football, from parents of the youngest Pop Warner players to those in the professional ranks.

More and more players in the NFL are succumbing to symptoms of memory loss, inability to concentrate and changes in personality that they attribute to repeated blows to the head during play. But as their numbers grow, researchers are struggling to keep up with understanding the brain injuries that concussions can cause. Now, for the first time, scientists are classifying the brain injury from head trauma into four distinct stages.

(MORE: NFL Players May Be More Vulnerable to Alzheimer’s Disease)

Most agree that repeated mild trauma to the brain in the form of concussions can result in chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), or a gradual buildup of a brain protein called tau. Just as with Alzheimer’s patients, where accumulation of plaques and tau tangles can space out healthy brain tissue and let nerve connections wither away, damage caused by concussions can trigger the accumulation of tau in CTE cases, eventually forming deposits large enough to interfere with key functions such as learning, planning and organization.

In the latest study, published in the journal Brain, scientists led by Dr. Ann McKee studied the brains of 68 deceased patients with CTE in order to find patterns in the way the disease develops. McKee, a professor of neurology and pathology at VA Boston Healthcare System and Boston University School of Medicine, spent more than two decades researching Alzheimer’s disease. She decided to apply the same order in staging brains that she had become accustomed to in her Alzheimer’s work. The number of CTE brains she and her team studied is the largest to date, and allowed them to see patterns in the way the disease progressed. The patients included football players, hockey players, boxers and veterans (many of whom were athletes) and one who engaged in self-inflicted head-banging behavior.

(MORE: Why Leather Football Helmets Could Provide a Better Defense Against Concussion)

In order to generate the least biased analysis possible, McKee and her pathology team conducted the autopsy analysis of the brain tissue, while another group led by Robert Stern, a neurologist and neurosurgeon at Boston University School of Medicine, carried out detailed interviews with the deceased patients’ families about the patients’ lives, behaviors and symptoms.

In her first pass at the data, McKee was able to discern a distinct pattern of where and how CTE progressed. She and her team found focal points where the injury to the brain seemed to start. These were concentrated in the frontal lobe, deep in the valleys of the convoluted cerebral cortex. Cortex tissue resembles a crumbled piece of paper with folds that create peaks and valleys, and the lesions of CTE seemed to start in the valleys where small blood vessels also congregate. “There is a fairly stereotyped lesion; where the gray matter dives in to create a valley in the brain is where we see the greatest damage,” says McKee. “We also see over and over in all of these cases that there is a strong tendency of the disease to start around blood vessels, which means the blood vessel is damaged with the injury.”

(MORE: The Problem with Football: How to Make It Safer)

While it’s not clear what triggers the damage, McKee suspects that the junction of the elastic blood vessels butting up against the more gelatinous cortex tissue may be particularly vulnerable to the shearing forces from an impact.

Once the damage is done, however, it’s difficult to stop. Even after the physical blows no longer occur, a destructive chain of events is already in motion. From these seed points in the frontal lobes, damage to nerves and brain tissue radiates to other parts of the brain, until it eventually engulfs most of the organ, impairing many cognitive functions. “Even if a person doesn’t get additional trauma, the disease progresses, like a lit fire,” says McKee. “The fire takes hold and continues to affect the brain with more lesions the longer the person lives.”

(VIDEO: Game Changer: Kevin Guskiewicz, Impact Investigator)

Because the study included the brains of patients who died at a range of ages, between 17 and 98, McKee could see the growing buildup of tau in the brain among the older cases. She could also see distinct stages of the disease, from lesser signs of lesions and tau to greater depositions. She could then correlate later stages of damage to longer play for the football players, and therefore likely more concussions.

While the findings confirm, and perhaps even reinforce how damaging concussions can be, McKee says they could also lead to better treatments for CTE. For one, recognizing that the disease begins with small lesions in the blood vessels could lead to helmets or other equipment that better protect the most vulnerable parts of the brain.

(VIDEO: This Is Your Brain on Football)

In addition, it could help scientists develop higher-resolution brain scans to detect these early signs of the disease. Current technology is not able to find such small abnormalities, but researchers are testing a tracer that could detect the tiniest deposits of tau protein that would alert doctors to the potential for CTE. Patients could then be warned to avoid repeated head trauma like those that might occur on the football field.

Understanding that the damage occurs in the blood vessels could also lead to ways of protecting those vessels and preventing the damage from spreading to the rest of the brain. It’s not clear yet what is causing the initial lesions to seed damage to other parts of the brain, but if the damage causes leakage of agents that are toxic to nerve cells, for example, drugs or other interventions may block the added injury these lesions can cause.

(MORE: Study: Kids Competing Too Soon After Concussions)

The insights from CTE could also help researchers develop better treatments for other neurodegenerative conditions as well. “I’m optimistic that this disease gives us lots of insights into other diseases like Alzheimer’s,” says McKee. “If we could reduce tau somehow or wall off the early stages of the disease, we can prevent the degenerative part from developing.” Avoiding head trauma may not always be possible, but stopping the damage it can cause may one day be more realistic.

 Originally posted by By , Staff Writer at Time, in Health & Family Dec. 04, 2012

Read more: http://healthland.time.com/2012/12/04/study-details-how-brain-injury-from-concussions-progresses/#ixzz2ENWeEXKD

 

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Thoughtfully Fashionable Gifts That Transform Lives at Home and Abroad in One Click!

Thoughtfully Fashionable Gifts That Transform Lives at Home and Abroad in One Click: ‘Tis the Season of Shopping for a Change!

San Mateo, California (PRWEB) October 31, 2012

This time of year, discriminating shoppers oftentimes find their search for personal gifts to be daunting and overwhelming. Gift givers spend hours on end looking for items that have personal meaning for their loved ones, friends, business associates and the like. To help shoppers’ ease their gift decision angst, an upstart web-based shopping site offers an ideal solution for thoughtful and fashionable gifts that simultaneously transform lives abroad and at home in the United States. At Shopping for a Change® (SFAC), consumers can find beautiful fair trade jewelry, accessories and home décor handmade by artisans in impoverished countries that look good, feel good and do good all in one click of the mouse. Impacting change around the world, the 501(c) (3) nonprofit organization serves as a portal for artisans in impoverished countries to sell their fair trade handmade products, while helping their communities, their families and U.S. nonprofit organizations. Net proceeds are split equally between funding an annual community improvement project abroad in the areas of education, health and clean water and aiding a U.S.-based nonprofit organization of the web shopper’s choosing from SFAC’s partner list.

Trending with Celebrities and Bloggers

Trendhunter Magazine featured Shopping for a Change in its August 15, 2012 blog “Ethical Artisan-Empowering Organizations” and, the organization, which qualified to be on the Great Nonprofits 2012 list for Social Justice is expected to make that list on November 15th.

The handmade products showcased on the internet shopping site are in hot demand, too, and are on the radar of many celebrities and bloggers: Gayle King, Deidre Hall, Brook Shields and Maya Rudolph are all sporting jewelry from the Andean Collection. Actresses Goldie Hawn and Meryl Streep are two of many celebs sporting bracelets from Same Sky, another featured collection on SFAC. And, SFAC’s artisan groups’ crafts have been featured in popular magazines including: People and O Magazine.

“Seeing all the beauty of that country coupled with the despair and hardship made me realize how, if it wasn’t for an accident of birth” it could have been me,” – Stacey Horowitz, Founder of Shopping For a Change

The Woman Behind The Change

The unique upstart digital business platform/model is the brainchild of San Mateo’s Stacey Horowitz, who developed Shopping for a Change after having an epiphany while anticipating her upcoming 50th birthday. Contemplating how she was going to leave this world a better place than when she arrived, three key events during her 50th year were instrumental game changers in her life that would turn her contemplation into action, benefiting the life of others around the globe. A middle school philanthropic project, a trip to Galapagos Islands and Peru, and the realization of “seeing all the beauty of that country coupled with the despair and hardship made me realize how, if it wasn’t for an accident of birth” it could have been me,” says Horowitz.

A year and a half later, Shopping for a Change was born with the motto: empowering others, transforming lives®. Launching its website in September 2010, SFAC serves as a digital community where artisans, consumers and charitable organizations have a symbiotic relationship following fair trade principles. Doing good, feeling good and looking good in one fell swoop, this web-based site should be on everyone’s shopping list!

Shopping for a Change® (SFAC) empowering others, transforming lives® is a web-based 501(c)(3) non-profit organization where artisans (predominantly women) from developing countries, sell their handmade creations enabling them to earn a sustainable income and lift themselves from poverty. The net proceeds subsidize community improvement projects abroad as well as help fund select U.S.-based non-profit organizations of the web shopper’s choosing from SFAC’s partner list.

Ethical Fashion for Today’s Consumer
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Supreme Court Allows Health Care Law Largely to Stand

Supreme Court Allows Health Care Law Largely to Stand

WASHINGTON — The Supreme Court on Thursday largely let stand President Obama’s health care overhaul, in a mixed ruling that Court observers were rushing to analyze.

The decision was a striking victory for the president and Congressional Democrats, with a majority, including the conservative chief justice, John G. Roberts Jr., affirming the central legislative pillar of Mr. Obama’s term.

Many observers called the case the most significant before the court since at least the 2000 Bush v. Gore ruling, which decided a presidential election. In addition to the political reverberations, the case helps set the rules for one of the largest and fastest-growing sectors of the economy, one that affects nearly everyone from cradle to grave.

The debate over health care remains far from over, with Republicans vowing to carry on their fight against the law, which they see as an unaffordable infringement on the rights of individuals. The presumptive Republican presidential nominee, Mitt Romney, has promised to undo it if elected.

But the ruling is a crucial victory for the law that will allow its introduction to continue in the coming years. Passed in 2010, the law is intended to end the United States’ status as the only rich country with large numbers of uninsured people, by expanding both the private market and Medicaid.

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Lawyer finds solace in his art

June 8, 2012

By Pat Milhizer — pmilhizer@lbpc.com
Law Bulletin staff writer
Chicago Daily Law Bulletin

Bradley Weiss prosecuted government contractors accused of fraud in Washington, D.C., in 1999 when he developed Parkinson’s disease after a toxic injection during nasal surgery.

He moved home to Chicago and eventually became of counsel at Miner, Barnhill & Galland P.C. to represent plaintiffs in civil rights and employee rights litigation.

He worked at the firm until 2010 when Parkinson’s symptoms prevented him from practicing law.

“I was a very good communicator. I used to speak well, used to do teaching, lecturing. I did lobbying for the government. I did all kinds of stuff,” Weiss said. “When I lost the ability to do all that stuff, I felt I couldn’t represent my clients like I should.

“So I began to segue into something else — arts.”

Weiss, 58, picked up a camera in 2004 during a trip to France. He came home with about 3,000 photos.

Two years later, he went to Colombia and captured images of mountains, ranches and residents. More photography trips followed in Mexico, New York and Costa Rica.

“I’ve always been creative, but I never knew I could shoot until I tried it,” Weiss said. “And the more I shot, the more support I got for it.”

In January, he brought his Costa Rica photos, which documented the village and people of Montezuma, to the Chicago Photography Center. Twenty-five of those photos — and some of his others — were displayed Thursday at a reception at Mars Gallery, 1139 W. Fulton Market, that attracted about 250 people.

The gallery will show Weiss’ photos through June 21. Twenty percent of all sales will benefit Rush University Medical Center.

Miner, Barnhill & Galland co-sponsored the event. Weiss said the firm became like family after Parkinson’s symptoms appeared.

“That firm has been there for me from start to finish,” Weiss said.

William A. Miceli, co-managing partner at the firm, called Weiss “remarkable.”

“He’s never lost his focus on work and has persevered with the disease,” Miceli said. “It really has not affected his heart and desire to be productive. And that has been an inspiration.”

As a lawyer, Weiss showed creative skills in cases, Miceli said.

“He is the kind of lawyer that can see relationships and put together a narrative that will support the prosecution of a case. That’s really what he brings. He brings the creative element in the process,” Miceli said.

Weiss will donate a percentage of his sales to Rush because that’s where he recently underwent treatments.

With “deep brain stimulation,” surgeons drilled two holes in his head in December. The following month, they connected wires from his head to a device implanted in his chest.

With another device that Weiss wears on his waist, he can send electric charges to his brain to help stimulate movement.

Shortly after the treatment, Weiss could use his hands freely again and walk without a cane. He could eat whatever meals he wanted. A week after the treatment, he went dancing late into the night.

He admitted that he faces dark days, but he talks about them in a matter-of-fact tone — without any hint that he’s looking for sympathy.

“You work through it day by day,” Weiss said. “Planning for the future is almost impossible. You don’t know what the future is going to be.”

His photos — samples are available at zumaarts.com — provide something that Parkinson’s can’t take away.

“It’s an ability,” Weiss said, “to communicate.”

©

2012

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Brilliant Litigation Attorney Stricken with Parkinson’s Disease Turns Professional Artistic Photojournalist with Debut of His Photos at Chicago’s Mars Gallery Thursday, June 7, 2012

Brilliant Litigation Attorney Stricken with Parkinson’s Disease Turns Professional Artistic Photojournalist with Debut of His Photos at Chicago’s Mars Gallery Thursday, June 7, 2012

Portion of art proceeds to benefit The Parkinson’s Disease and Movement Disorder Program at Rush University Medical Center as a thank you o the doctors for giving Bradley his life back

June 7, 2012 – CHICAGO -– Brilliant litigation attorney Bradley Weiss, stricken with Parkinson’s Disease at the height of his Washington, DC career working with the Department of Justice, FBI and more, and as Of Counsel at Chicago’s prestigious law firm, Miner, BarnHill & Galland, turns professional artistic photojournalist with the debut of his photo series Montezuma Nights at Chicago’s Mars Gallery, opening Thursday evening June 7, 2012, 1139 W. Fulton Market.  Curated by renownedcurator and photographer Susan Aurinko. Opening night reception is being sponsored by a collaboration of the many different connections in Bradley’s life including his former Chicago law firm  Miner, Barnhill & Galland and Highland Park restaurant 2nd Street Bistro with live music by The Side Cars.  Thanks to a risky surgery called DBS (deep brain stimulation last December) Bradley’s Parkinson’s has slowed down and according to him, he is almost back to his old self!  To honor the Rush University Medical Center doctors who gave Bradley his life back, a portion of art proceeds opening night will benefit The Parkinson’s Disease & Movement Disorder Program at Rush University Medical Center (Rush) as a deep hearted thank you.

Opening Reception of Montezuma Nights – A Photographic Exhibition by Bradley Weiss, curated by Susan Aurinko. Runs thru June 21st. Portion of art proceeds benefits Parkinson’s disease.

Thursday, June 7, 2012

6:00pm – 9:00pm

 

MARS GALLERY

1139 West Fulton Market, Chicago

312.226.7808

 

In honor of: The Parkinson’s Disease & Movement Disorder Program at Rush University Medical Center and its team of magnificent doctors

 

Live Music by The Side Cars

Food graciously provided by 2nd Street Bistro, Highland Park

Libations graciously provided by Miner, BarnHill & Galland

 

Free to public

 

A portion of art proceeds opening night will benefit The Parkinson’s Disease & Movement Disorder Program at Rush University MedicalCenter as a deep hearted thank you to the doctors that gave Bradley his life back!

Interview Opportunities: Bradley Weiss, the doctors from The Parkinson’s Disease & Movement Disorder Program at Rush, Miner, BarnHill & Galland partner Jeffrey Miner, curator Susan Aurinko)

Photo Opportunities:  Bradley Weiss, his children Jack (17) & Leah (13), the doctors from The Parkinson’s Disease & Movement Disorder Program at Rush, Miner, BarnHill & Galland partner Judson Miner.

To arrange interviews, for a media kit and/or images and for more information contact: Abbe Sparks @ abbesparks@gmail.com or abbe@abbesparksmediarelations.com

-###-

Bradley Weiss, Litigation Attorney & Fine Art Photographer
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Brilliant Litigation Attorney Stricken with Parkinson’s Disease Turns Professional Artistic Photojournalist with Debut of His Photos at Chicago’s Mars Gallery Thursday, June 7, 2012

Brilliant Litigation Attorney Stricken with Parkinson’s Disease Turns Professional Artistic Photojournalist with Debut of His Photos at Chicago’s Mars Gallery Thursday, June 7, 2012

June 4, 2012 – CHICAGO -– Brilliant litigation attorney Bradley Weiss, who was stricken with Parkinson’s Disease at the height of his Washington, DC career with the Department of Justice and as Of Counsel at Chicago’s prestigious law firm, Miner, BarnHill & Galland, turns professional artistic photojournalist with the debut of his photo series Montezuma Nights at Chicago’s Mars Gallery, opening Thursday evening June 7, 2012, 1139 W. Fulton Market.  Curated by renownedcurator and photographer Susan Aurinko. Opening night reception is being sponsored by a collaboration of the many different connections in Bradley’s life including his former Chicago law firm  Miner, Barnhill & Galland and Highland Park restaurant 2nd Street Bistro with live music by The Side Cars.  Thanks to a risky surgery called DBS (deep brain stimulation last December) Bradley’s Parkinson’s has slowed down and according to him, he is almost back to his old self!  To honor the Rush University Medical Center doctors who gave Bradley his life back, a portion of art proceeds opening night will benefit The Parkinson’s Disease & Movement Disorder Program at Rush University MedicalCenter (Rush) as a deep hearted thank you.

Opening Reception of Montezuma Nights – A Photographic Exhibition by Bradley Weiss, Curated by Susan Aurinko. Portion of art proceeds benefits Parkinson’s disease.

Thursday, June 7, 2012

6:00pm – 9:00pm

 

MARS GALLERY

1139 West Fulton Market, Chicago  –  312.226.7808

In honor of: The Parkinson’s Disease & Movement Disorder Program at Rush University MedicalCenter and its team of magnificent doctors

Live Music by The Side Cars

Food graciously provided by 2nd Street Bistro, Highland Park

Libations graciously provided by Miner, BarnHill & Galland

Free to public

A portion of art proceeds opening night will benefit The Parkinson’s Disease & Movement Disorder Program at Rush University MedicalCenter as a deep hearted thank you to the doctors that gave Bradley his life back!